500

The Project has just reached its 500 referrals mark! The Team have worked hard to reach this milestone and to manage the expectations and needs of the clients, who very often have several issues to be worked through.

Congratulations and a big Thank You to all the Co-ordinators and the Caseload Support officer. Don’t stop – keep going there are more older people affected by cancer who need the support of an advocate.

Kath Curley

Project Manager

Come and join our team here at Staffordshire & Wolverhampton Cancer Advocacy!

We have a vacancy for a Volunteer co-ordinator for our project.

Working in partnership with and funded by Macmillan Cancer Support, an exciting opportunity has arisen for a self-motivated individual to play a key role in this project.
You will support the Project Lead and provide line management and supervision to volunteer advocates to achieve the outcomes of the Staffordshire and Wolverhampton Cancer Advocacy and Support Project and provide support for all volunteers across the BJF Macmillan projects.

Due to the innovative nature of the project we are looking for someone who is enthusiastic about this project development and is experienced in advocacy and volunteer management and support.
Secondments will be considered.
For more information please follow this link: https://www.bjf.org.uk/about-us/who-we-are/vacancies/4

What a coincidence!

At last week’s COPA Programme Project Management Group Meeting Kathleen Gillett, from Dorset Macmillan Advocacy,  gave a presentation on Macmillan’s Recovery Package.

Macmillan - The Recovery Package

The Recovery Package is a series of key interventions which, when delivered together, can greatly improve outcomes for people living with and beyond cancer.

The Recovery Package is made up of the following elements:

  • A Holistic Needs Assessment (HNA) and care planning.
  • A Treatment Summary completed at the end of each acute treatment phase
  • A Cancer Care Review completed by the GP or practice nurse to discuss the person’s needs.
  • An education and support event such as Health and Well-being Clinics.

Today, Collette Cooper and I met with Sarah Gorton, Macmillan Cancer Survivorship Project Manager, based at Royal Stoke Hospital, who has taken up a 2 year Macmillan funded project. Sarah is working with the CNSs, across Royal Stoke and County Hospitals, for 4 cancer sites:

  1. Head and Neck
  2. Brain
  3. Primary Bone
  4. Gynaecological

to implement an electronic Holistic Needs Assessment (eHNA) within these clinics as an integral part of the Recovery Package.

We discussed with Sarah where advocacy fits within the Package and that Advocates compliment and support the work the CNSs are doing. We hope this will lead to greater partnership and collaborative working with the health professionals.

Good luck Sarah!

 

Kath Curley

Staffs and Wolves Cancer Advocacy and Support Project Manager.

New Macmillan Project for Staffordshire

I am pleased to be able to write about a new Macmillan funded project that is taking place in Staffordshire.

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The Project is led by a familiar face to the Staffs and Wolves Cancer Advocacy and Support Project – Jo Coulson – and Angie Bunn has taken up the role of Engagement Officer.

Cancer support services are perceived to be patchy or even inaccessible when the person affected by cancer is also Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual and Transgender (LGBT). There is a lack of solid evidence in relation to this area of need and an absence of information regarding effective approaches to service provision. With a view to improving this situation this project seeks to redress this by speaking directly to people from these groups and undertaking an in-depth assessment of current service “fit”. Recommendations will be made for service redesign based on the experiences recorded across Staffordshire, including Stoke on Trent. It is expected that the recommendations made will influence services nationally and may form the basis of a much broader review of services.

Scoping aims are to find out:

  • What are LGBT people’s experiences of cancer treatment and support locally?
  • What factors facilitate/inhibit open discussions between clinicians and LGBT patients?
  • How well educated are local health professionals about LGBT issues (both clinical and personal – do doctors make assumptions)?
  • What are awareness levels within LGBT communities about specific cancer risks, screening programmes, etc?
  • Is there a need for specialised LGBT code of practice, cancer information and literature, etc?
  • Can true ‘patient centred care’ disregard sexuality or gender variance?

 

It will use the following strategies:

  • Face-to-face meetings & capturing stories
  • Surveys and questionnaires
  • Focus groups, workshops, roadshows
  • Internet and social media
  • Workplace engagement with clinical staff
  • Information gathering and capturing experiences, identifying trends and gaps
  • User involvement in project development

 

We wish Jo and Angie all the best with this Project and look forward to the outcomes. I will try to keep you all up-to-date as the Project progresses.

Kath Curley

Project Manager

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So long…’not only a pleasure but also a privelege’

Following on from our previous post on the loss of legends, Sunday brought more sad news of the death of yet another legend…. Sir Terry Wogan.

Sir Terry was well known for many, many reasons and sadly cancer brought the untimely end to his life and his career.

For me, Sir Terry was the face of the BBC’s Children in Need charity, but for others he was so much more, from the host of Eurovision, to the voice to listen to in the mornings on his ‘Wake up to Wogan’ Breakfast Show.

I’m sure many of you will join us in saying Rest In Peace Sir Terry Wogan.

Rowena

Pudsey black bandana

Loss of Legends

Throughout January 2016 we have, with great sadness, heard of the deaths of many iconic figures who have died of cancer: Lemmy Kilmister, David Bowie, Alan Rickman and Rene Angelil.

They have been musical legends, Masters of Arts and culture, stage and screen and, their deaths have come as a shock. Whether individuals appreciate their talents or not, they have given so much to their fans and followers and have left us a legacy on vinyl, stage and screen.

Anyone can be affected by cancer either as a person with a diagnosis, family member, friend or carer.

Cancer Social Group

Have a look at what is going on at the Stoke-on-Trent Social Group. The group meets once a month and has a variety of things on offer.

For more information contact Collette Cooper at the Beth Johnson Foundation on 01782 844036 or Helen Farmer at North Staffs Carers on 01782 739100

Cancer Social Group Flyer Jan-June 2016